Some music to set the mood

I’m back.

🙂

Anyway, all good pubs need some background music to set the mood. So let’s start the grand reopening with this crazy song. Don’t ask me why–but I love it.

 

Make a joyful noise to the Lord my friends.

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The logical conclusion

Have you ever had one of the moments when things suddenly become very clear? I had one today. It wasn’t the most uplifting moment but it was helpful nonetheless.

My middle child has a calculator that is her “cellphone.” This morning she held it up like a camera and told me to say “cheeese” and “took” my picture. When she was finished I asked her if I could see what I looked like. So she turned the calculator around and I was the number zero.

Huh. I thought. How appropriate.

What’s on my bookshelf?

No one asked me what I was reading but I thought I would share it anyway.  The method I have developed for reading involves 3 categories.

1. Professional Development–this category is for books that I think will help me grow as a pastor.

2. Personal Development–this category is for books that I think will help my faith grow or encourage character growth,etc. Really, one could argue that category 1 and 2 are two sides of the same coin.

3. Pleasure Reading–this category is for books that I read simply for pleasure.


 

1. I am currently reading D.A. Carson’s A Call to Spiritual Reformation. In this book, Carson takes a careful look at the prayers of Paul in the New Testament to encourage us in our own prayer life. Carson is one of my favorite Bible teachers; I just started this but I am certain it will be of great benefit to my vocation.

2. Last night I just started James B. Jordan’s commentary on Judges called (humorously) God’s War on Humanism. I have only read the introduction but I am excited to get further into this one.

3. For pleasure, I am reading the final book in the Expanse Trilogy: Abaddon’s Gate by James S.A. Corey. These books are a lot of fun. One of the more interesting things I’ve noticed about these books is either at a crucial moment or simply as an important character, the authors (James S.A. Corey is a fake name for two men) bring in Christian clergy. In the first book it was a Methodist missionary. In the second book it was a military chaplain and in Abaddon’s Gate it is a Methodist minister. I’m not Methodist and I don’t like how liberal they have made the clergy but it is encouraging to see that a secular, sci-fi work, recognizes how important religion is to society and the authors seem to feel authentic world building in the far future will still involve established religion. One of the more interesting things about this book is the main character made a comment last night that, once again, reminded me that biblical illiteracy makes it much harder to appreciate literature. The character, Holden, was trying to avoid going to a certain destination and doing everything he could to avoid going. But the harder he tried to flee, the more likely it was that he would end up there. Finally, Holden gave up and realized he was going to have to go to the place he wanted to avoid and said, “Alright. I guess I’ll go to Nineveh.” A small allusion to the book of Jonah that really provides a tremendous depth into how hopeless the character Holden must have felt at that moment. Something that a reader unfamiliar with the Bible, and in this case the book of Jonah, would miss completely.

Do right!

I am fairly certain that everyone has a song which they identify with; a song that on some deep level sums up how they feel and interact with the world. This song is sometimes called one’s “soundtack”. And I am also fairly certain that after 31 years on this earth my soundtrack would be Do Right! By Jimmie’s Chicken Shack. Because, let’s be honest: what do I do right?

If you are curious, here is a link to the music video. Listen carefully to the lyrics. What do I do right? Nothing. 

Things I’d like to have

If I could have anything, aside from the parousia, a vacation home down south, a TSX and probably a lot of other things… I’d like to own one of these mugs.

I’d love to drink my beer out of a mug with Luther, Calvin or Spurgeon’s face looking back at me.

Unfortunately, if I buy one of two of those, then I can’t buy the ingredients to make the beer and so I’d be drinking water out of a beer mug.

Maybe Buddha was right: all life is suffering.